Web-based Content

Human Migration: The Story of a Community

Grade Levels

10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, 9th Grade

Course, Subject

Geography
Related Academic Standards
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  • Big Ideas
    Information to gain or expand knowledge can be acquired through a variety of sources.
    Purpose, topic and audience guide types of writing
    Writing is a means of documenting thinking
    Geographic representations are essential to explain the spatial organization of people, places, and environments.
    Geography is used to explain the past, interpret the present, and plan for the future.
    Historical context is needed to comprehend time and space.
    Historical interpretation involves an analysis of cause and result.
    Perspective helps to define the attributes of historical comprehension.
    The history of the Commonwealth continues to influence Pennsylvanians today, and has impacted the United States and the rest of the world.
    The history of the United States continues to influence its citizens, and has impacted the rest of the world.
    World history continues to influence Pennsylvanians, citizens of the United States, and individuals throughout the world today.
  • Concepts
    Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions work together to impact writing quality
    Informational sources have unique purposes.
    Informational writing describes, explains and/or summarizes ideas or content in a variety of genre.
    Organization of information facilitates meaning.
    Research is an inquiry based process.
    The writing supports a thesis or research question based on research, observation, and/or experience.
    Validity of information must be established.
    Appropriate connections to the United States and/or contemporary issues make world history more relevant to students in Pennsylvania.
    Biography explores the life of an individual.
    Biography is a historical construct used to reveal positive and/or negative influences an individual can have on civilization.
    Biography is a historical construct used to reveal positive and/or negative influences an individual can have on the United States society.
    Biography is a historical construct used to reveal positive and/or negative influences an individual can have on world history.
    Chronology may be relative or absolute.
    Comprehension of the experiences of individuals, society, and how past human experience has adapted builds aptitude to apply to civic participation.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending past cultures throughout Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending societies throughout Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending society in the Pennsylvania.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending society in the Pennsylvania. Domestic instability, ethnic and racial relations, labor relation, immigration, and wars and revolutions are examples of social disagreement and collaboration.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending society in the United States. Domestic instability, ethnic and racial relations, labor relation, immigration, and wars and revolutions are examples of social disagreement and collaboration.
    Conflict and cooperation among social groups, organizations, and nation-states are critical to comprehending the American society.
    Geographic tools and technologies are used to display spatial information.
    Groups that have influenced United States history had different beliefs, customs, ceremonies, traditions, and social practices.
    Groups that have influenced world history had different beliefs, customs, ceremonies, traditions, and social practices.
    Historical causation involves motives, reasons, and consequences that result in events and actions.
    Historical causation involves motives, reasons, and consequences that result in events and actions. Some consequences may be impacted by forces of the irrational or the accidental.
    Historical comprehension involves evidence-based discussion and explanation, an analysis of sources including multiple points of view, and an ability to read critically to recognize fact from conjecture and evidence from assertion.
    Historical literacy requires a focus on time and space, and an understanding of the historical context of events and actions.
    Historical literacy requires a focus on time and space, and an understanding of the historical context, as well as an awareness of point of view.
    Historical skills (organizing information chronologically, explaining historical issues, locating sources and investigate materials, synthesizing and evaluating evidence, and developing arguments and interpretations based on evidence) are used by an analytical thinker to create a historical construction.
    Human environment interaction affects the characteristics of place and region.
    Human organizations work to socialize members and, even though there is a constancy of purpose, changes occur over time.
    Learning about the past and its different contexts shaped by social, cultural, and political influences prepares one for participation as active, critical citizens in a democratic society.
    Life in the past was different than today, and it is difficult to understand people in history because their knowledge and values are different than today.
    Long-term continuities and discontinuities in the structures of Pennsylvania culture provide vital contributions to contemporary issues.
    Long-term continuities and discontinuities in the structures of Pennsylvania society provide vital contributions to contemporary issues. Belief systems and religion, commerce and industry, innovations, settlement patterns, social organization, transportation and trade, and equality are examples continuity and change.
    Long-term continuities and discontinuities in the structures of United States culture provide vital contributions to contemporary issues.
    Long-term continuities and discontinuities in the structures of United States society provide vital contributions to contemporary issues. Belief systems and religion, commerce and industry, innovations, settlement patterns, social organization, transportation and trade, and equality are examples continuity and change.
    Mental maps store geographic images of where something is and how to get there.
    People create regions to interpret Earth's complexity.
    People perceive places and regions differently.
    Places and features are distributed spatially across the Earth's surface.
    Social entities clash over disagreement and assist each other when advantageous.
    Social entities throughout the world clash over disagreement and assist each other when advantageous.
    Some things change over time, and some things are constant.
    Stories from the past are written by people with different views using various sources.
    Textual evidence, material artifacts, the built environment, and historic sites are central to understanding United States history.
    Textual evidence, material artifacts, the built environment, and historic sites are central to understanding world history.
    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has chosen writings, material artifacts, and historic sites to identify a common cultural heritage.
    The United States has chosen writings, material artifacts, and historic sites to identify a common cultural heritage.
    United States history can offer an individual discerning judgment in public and personal life, supply examples for living, and thinking about one’s self in the dimensions of time and space.
    United States history can offer an individual judicious understanding about one’s self in the dimensions of time and space.
    World history can offer an individual discerning judgment in public and personal life, supply examples for living, and thinking about one’s self in the dimensions of time and space.
    World history can offer an individual judicious understanding about one’s self in the dimensions of time and space.
    World history looks for common patterns that emerge across all cultures.
    World history looks for common patterns that emerge across all cultures. Long-term continuities and discontinuities in the structures of societies provide vital contributions to contemporary issues.
  • Competencies
    Analyze and evaluate information from sources for relevance to the research question, topic or thesis.
    Choose a topic/question to research and establish a purpose.
    Cite all sources properly when quoting, paraphrasing or summarizing.
    Compile information from resource materials.
    Critically evaluate primary and secondary sources for validity, perspective, bias, and relationship to topic.
    Develop a clear research question or thesis statement.
    Develop and refine a research question or thesis statement.
    Develop search procedures to locate and gather information from traditional sources (libraries) as well as electronic databases, data sets and other electronic reference materials.
    Document sources of information, including references and works cited, using an appropriate style (e.g.: MLA, APA, Chicago).
    Evaluate information from a variety of reference sources for its relevance to the research question, topic or thesis.
    Follow the conventional style for the type of document and use page formats, fonts and spacing that contribute to the readability and impact of the document.
    Identify a single thesis, research question or topic. Attribute sources of information when appropriate. Use information in maps, charts, graphs, time lines, tables and diagrams to inform writing.
    Identify a single thesis, research question or topic. Attribute sources of information when appropriate. Interpret information in maps, charts, graphs, time lines, tables and diagrams to inform writing.Translate technical language into common language and/or define terms as necessary.
    Identify characteristics of primary and secondary source materials.
    Identify resource materials to achieve a research goal.
    Incorporate an expansive and expressive vocabulary that includes terms specific to the topic
    Informational Writing: Develop substantial, relevant and illustrative content that demonstrates a clear understanding of the purpose (content).
    Informational Writing: Employ effective organizational strategies and structures, such as logical order and transitions, which develop a controlling idea (organization).
    Locate and select appropriate resource materials to achieve a research goal.
    Locate and select the appropriate source materials to achieve a research goal.
    Organize and present information drawn from research.
    Select a topic and develop a thesis/research question.
    Summarize relevant information from source material to achieve a research goal.
    Synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources.
    Synthesize relevant information from source materials to achieve a research goal.
    Write to inform by: • presenting information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience. • applying organizational structures that communicate information and ideas accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies fact from opinion. • developing informational genres that relate to a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g.: instructions, memos, e-mails, correspondence, project plans, proposals, and resumes).
    Write to inform by: • presenting information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience. • applying organizational structures that communicate information and ideas accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies fact from opinion. • communicating quantitative and qualitative technical information and concepts from primary and secondary sources accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies evidence from inference. • developing informational genres that relate to a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g.: instructions, memos, e-mails, correspondence, project plans, proposals, and resumes).
    Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions work together to impact writing quality
    Analyze a primary source for accuracy and bias and connect it to a time and place in United States history.
    Analyze a primary source for accuracy and bias, then connect it to a time and place in world history.
    Analyze historical causation for a specific event.
    Analyze how human and physical characteristics define place.
    Analyze the interaction of cultural, economic, geographic, political, and social relations for a specific time and place.
    Apply the theme of continuity and change in Pennsylvania history and relate the benefits and drawbacks of your example.
    Apply the theme of continuity and change in United States history and relate the benefits and drawbacks of your example.
    Apply the theme of continuity and change in world history and relate the benefits and drawbacks of your example.
    Articulate the context of a historical event or action.
    Compare the present to a past era by identifying similarities and differences between the two chronological periods.
    Construct a biography of a non-American and generate conclusions regarding his/her qualities and limitations.
    Construct a biography of an American and generate conclusions regarding his/her qualities and limitations.
    Contrast how a historically important issue in the United States was resolved and compare what techniques and decisions may be applied today.
    Contrast multiple perspectives of individuals and groups in interpreting other times, cultures, and place.
    Create a timeline using chronological sequence and spatial context.
    Describe key events and individuals from the past, and articulate the social and spatial context of a historical event or action.
    Describe the spatial organization of places using concepts of location, distance, direction, scale, movements, and region.
    Differentiate between primary and secondary sources and evaluate the point-of-view of the author.
    Draw a map from memory.
    Evaluate cause-and-result relationships bearing in mind multiple causations.
    Explain why certain writings, oral traditions, material artifacts, architecture, and historic places have been maintained in the present and given for the benefits of future generations.
    Identify a group in United States history and explain how it differed from other groups.
    Identify the unifying geographic characteristics of region, and explain how regions change.
    Illustrate how different people perceive places and regions.
    Summarize how conflict and compromise in Pennsylvania history impact contemporary society.
    Summarize how conflict and compromise in United States history impact contemporary society.
    Summarize how conflict and compromise in world history impact contemporary society.
    Synthesize a rationale for the study of a non-American individual in world history.
    Synthesize a rationale for the study of individuals in United States history.
    Use a map to answer geographic questions.
    Use information in maps, charts, graphs, time lines, tables, and diagrams to inform writing.

Description

This lesson will help students understand some key concepts of human migration through the examination of maps and migration patterns. Students will research and document the impact of migration on a region's cultural landscape. They will examine migration patterns on a global and national scale as a class and then apply that understanding to a class project telling a migration story about their own community.

Web-based Resource

Content Provider

National Geographic Education

 

As a part of the National Geographic Education and Children’s Media division, National Geographic Education focuses on working closely with and creating materials for educators and schools that bring the Society's spirit of exploration and adventure to our goal of educating young people about their world. 

To be effective in the modern world, young people will need to be able to thrive in diverse workplaces and respond to fast-changing circumstances. To act responsibly, they will need to understand how our interconnected world works so they can make informed decisions. These are the same qualities exemplified by National Geographic explorers for more than 125 years. For that reason, our work is aligned to a learning framework that defines the attitudes, skills, and knowledge of an explorer. 

Educators and learners can find and explore all materials created by National Geographic Education here, at NatGeoEd.org. With over one million visitors each month, the award-winning NG Education website is recognized as one of the most innovative sources for educational and reference content.

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