Lesson Plan

Compare and Contrast

Grade Levels

Kindergarten, Pre-Kindergarten

Course, Subject

Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening

Rationale

Students will be able to independently use their learning to: Compare and contrast texts across a range of genre.

Vocabulary

Compare, contrast, same, different, non-fiction, fiction

Objectives

The students will:

  • Compare and contrast characters and experiences in and across texts.
  • Move beyond simple identification of story elements to making connections between and among them in a text.  
  • Focus on similarities and differences between tests.  

Lesson Essential Question(s)

How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?

Duration

30-40 minutes/1-2 class periods

Materials

This book was chosen because it is a fiction story featuring characters that are blind. This book is a common library book and a scholastic text.  The Blind Mice, by Ed Young, Scholastic Inc. 1992.   The illustrations are engaging and strongly support the text. The story provides opportunities for comparison to the non-fiction texts in the unit. In this retelling of the Indian fable, seven blind mice discover different parts of an elephant and argue about its appearance.

 

Use of a Venn Diagram.   Any selection will be appropriate.  

venndiagram.jpg

Suggested Instructional Strategies

W:  The teacher will model the use of a Venn Diagram and how it is use to compare and contrast two texts. 
H:  The teacher will show a colorful title for a new book to share with the students.  
E:  During the modeling for Venn Diagram teacher will provide real life examples for compare and contrast skills.   (Through the use of students in the classroom.  Boys and girls/contrast, hair or eye color/compare.)
R:  After the initial Venn Diagram explanation, students will participate in whole group venn diagram activity for informational texts.
E:  Observe student answers and evaluate for understanding of compare and contrast application.  
T:  Through reteaching opportunities or enrichment activities to extend the learning. 
O:  Whole group learning activities will lead to small group application.  

Instructional Procedures

As the students enter the room have the students sign in.   Have each student make a prediction about the genre of the book   “Look at the cover of this book.  Do you think this book is fiction or non-fiction?”  Direct the students on what to do.  “Sign your name under your prediction. Why do you think that?”  

Call students to the carpet have each student make a prediction about the main idea of the book   “Look at the cover of this book.  What do you predict this book is about?” 

Direct children’s attention to the sign in. “ I notice that many of you predict that the story we are going to read today is going to be about mice Can someone share with the group why they made that prediction?” ( Possible Answers: I see mice on the book cover.)

 “You used the picture clues and the word clues from the title to help you make your prediction…that is good thinking.  When you think about what the story might be about, it helps to get your brain ready to understand.”

“ This is a fiction book.   A fiction book is make believe. As we read together, we will stop to talk to our partners about what he have learned about Helen Keller’s life, so be ready to be good listeners and speakers.  When we finish reading this story, you will be able to tell your partner how this fiction book is different from the non-fiction Helen Keller story we read yesterday,

Read the story with planned stopping points designated  

pg.1

Ask children to predict what the “strange something” was by the pond. “Look at the picture.   How are the mice going to figure out what the strange Something is if they can’t see?” Turn and Talk .   Several students share out. 

pg. 10-11 (spear page)

“Boys and girls the mice seem to have a disagreement about what the strange Something is. Why do you think they all have different ideas?

Have children talk with their partners. Listen in and have one or two children share out. ( Possible responses: They are blind.  They are each feeling different parts.)

 Stop after page 24 (mice argue)

“Boys and girls, talk to your partner.  With the information we have gotten from the mice, what do you think the strange Something is?”

Stop after page 25-29

“What did the white mouse do that was different from the other mice?”

(Possible response: He ran all over the strange Something.  He didn’t just touch one part. He put all the parts together.)

So let’s check our thinking….From what you know about the other mice and what the white mouse did, can you predict what the strange Something is?

Have children share their thoughts.

“Let’s keep reading to find out what the strange Something is?

Continue reading to end of the story.

 “Wow! ” It was an ELEPHANT!!!

        I would help the children to see the connections between how Helen Keller used her sense of touch and how the mice used their sense of touch to problem solve and get information.

 

Formative Assessment 1:  (Whole group oral response activity)

Teacher reviews the parts of a non-fiction book with students to identify similarities and differences comparing Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young and Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan by Gina Shaw.   Use vocabulary listed in the lesson plan.   Check for understanding by directing students to compare and contrast these two books.   The teacher will record student responses in the Venn Diagram.   “Boys and girls, remember the two books that we read, let's talk about how the books were the same and how they were different.   One example of how they are different is that one books is a story about a person's life, the other story is about events that happen to seven mice.”   After the teacher provides an example, the children will begin to offer similarities and differences to add to the Venn Diagram.  The teacher will model where responses should be recorded in the Venn Diagram.   This will be a whole group shared writing activity.   

venndiagram.jpg

 

The Story of Hellen Keller   Seven Blind Mice

Differences

Similarities Differences
Human Being (Real Person) Blind Characters Animals
Photographs Parts of the Book Illustrations
Real Life Person Words Made Up Characters
Biography   Story of Events
     

Formative Assessment

Formative Assessment 1:  (Whole group oral response activity)

Teacher reviews the parts of a non-fiction book with students to identify similarities and differences comparing Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young and Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan by Gina Shaw.   Use vocabulary listed in the lesson plan.   Check for understanding by directing students to compare and contrast these two books.   The teacher will record student responses on a white board or chart paper.   “Boys and girls, remember the two books that we read, let's talk about how the books were the same and how they were different.   One example of how they are different is that one books is a story about a person's life, the other story is about events that happen to seven mice.”   After the teacher provides an example, the children will begin to offer similarities and differences to add to the Venn Diagram.    

 

The Story of Hellen Keller   Seven Blind Mice

Differences

Similarities Differences
Human Being (Real Person) Blind Characters Animals
Photographs Parts of the Book Illustrations
Real Life Person Words Made Up Characters
Biography   Story of Events
     

Related Materials & Resources

Below is a file filled with pictures that you can use for comparisons when reading this story.  

pictures for Seven blind Mice.doc

 

The Story of Hellen Keller   Seven Blind Mice

Differences

Similarities Differences
Human Being (Real Person) Blind Characters Animals
Photographs Parts of the Book Illustrations
Real Life Person Words Made Up Characters
Biography   Story of Events
     

Author

Barb Schmid, Early Literacy Specialist for School District of Lancaster, Shanon Benson, Reading Specialist for Hollidaysburg Area School District, Jen Sugra, Elementary School Principal for Penn Manor School District

Date Published

November 06, 2012
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