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Analyzing Structure of Nonfiction Texts

Unit Plan

Analyzing Structure of Nonfiction Texts

Objectives

In this unit, students will explore the structure of nonfiction texts. Students will:

  • identify how structure supports the author’s purpose.
  • compare and contrast different text structures.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments in nonfiction texts.

Essential Questions

How do readers’ know what to believe in what they read, hear, and view?
How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?
What is this text really about?
What strategies and resources do I use to figure out unknown vocabulary?
Why learn new words?
  • How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
  • What is this text really about?
  • How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?
  • How do readers know what to believe in what they read, hear, and view?

Related Unit and Lesson Plans

Related Materials & Resources

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Materials haven't been entered into the unit plan.

Formative Assessment

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    Multiple-Choice Items

    1. Which text structure is used for explaining the similarities between two concepts?

    A

    contrast

    B

    narrate

    C

    compare

    D

    inform

    2. Which transition words are best used for suggesting differences between two concepts?

    A

    similarly, also, likewise

    B

    however, yet, on the other hand

    C

    additionally, also, besides

    D

    first, then, next

    3. Which element of an argument states a position on an issue?

    A

    reasons

    B

    evidence

    C

    support

    D

    claim

    Multiple-Choice Answer Key

    1. C

    2. B

    3. D

     

     

    Short-Answer Item:

    Have students choose a text to read or assign a text to each student. Suggested texts are listed below, but any book or article with a clear text structure may be used. You may allow students to use the Common Transitions Chart as a reference during this assessment.

    Have students complete the Short Answer Assessment (L-8-1_Short Answer Assessment.doc).

    Short-Answer Key and Scoring Rubric:

     

    Points

    Description

    3

    Student reads the text and correctly completes all of the following requirements:

    • identifies the author’s purpose
    • identifies the text structure
    • explains how the structure supports the author’s purpose or message

    2

    Student reads the text and correctly completes two of the requirements.

    1

    Student reads the text and correctly completes one of the requirements.

    0

    Student does not read the text or fails to complete any of the requirements.

     

    Performance Assessment:

    Have students write a position essay on an issue of their choice. Essays must have a clear claim, incorporate at least two appropriate reasons, and include evidence for the reasons.

    Students must also include a reflection on their essay, which indicates how they chose a text structure to support their purpose and how their motivation or bias affected their choice of evidence.

    Performance Assessment Scoring Rubric:

     

    Points

    Description

    4

    Student’s writing meets all of the following requirements:

    • is a position essay that states a claim on an issue
    • includes at least two appropriate reasons
    • includes evidence to support the reasons
    • includes a reflection on their essay

    3

    Student’s writing meets three of the requirements.

    2

    Student’s writing meets two of the requirements.

    1

    Student’s writing meets one of the requirements.

    0

    Student’s writing does not meet any of the requirements.

Final 06/07/2013
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