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Extending the Meaning of Vocabulary

Lesson Plan

Extending the Meaning of Vocabulary

Objectives

Students will extend their content-specific vocabulary knowledge about communities. With proper modeling, students will:

  • use grade-appropriate resources to establish and extend vocabulary.
  • use relevant content-specific vocabulary.
  • use appropriate strategies to extend the meaning of unfamiliar words.

Essential Questions

How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
What strategies and resources do I use to figure out unknown vocabulary?
What strategies and resources do learners use to figure out unknown vocabulary?
Why learn new words?
  • Why learn new words?
  • What strategies and resources do I use to figure out unknown vocabulary?
  • How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?

Vocabulary

  • Synonyms: Words that mean the same or nearly the same.
  • Antonyms: Words that mean the opposite.
  • Definition: The meaning of a word.

Duration

30 minutes/1 class period

Prerequisite Skills

Prerequisite Skills haven't been entered into the lesson plan.

Materials

  • student copies of the Interactive Vocabulary templates (L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 1.docx and L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 2.docx). You will need to select words and create a template prior to the lesson.
    • The following books are suggested for use with this lesson.
    • What Is a Community from A to Z? (AlphaBasiCs) by Bobbie Kalman. Crabtree Publishing Company, 2000.
    • Be My Neighbor by Maya Ajmera. Charlesbridge Publisher, 2006.
    • Communities by Gail Saunders-Smith. Capstone, 2000.
  • Teachers may substitute other books to provide a range of reading and level of text complexity.

Related Unit and Lesson Plans

Related Materials & Resources

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  • student copies of the Interactive Vocabulary templates (L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 1.docx and L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 2.docx). You will need to select words and create a template prior to the lesson.
    • The following books are suggested for use with this lesson.
    • What Is a Community from A to Z? (AlphaBasiCs) by Bobbie Kalman. Crabtree Publishing Company, 2000.
    • Be My Neighbor by Maya Ajmera. Charlesbridge Publisher, 2006.
    • Communities by Gail Saunders-Smith. Capstone, 2000.
  • Teachers may substitute other books to provide a range of reading and level of text complexity.

Formative Assessment

  • View

    The goal of this lesson is for students to develop vocabulary strategies to extend their understanding of words.

    • Observe students’ participation in large-group and partner activities.
    • Use the following checklist to assess students’ progress toward the goal of this lesson:
      • Student applies new vocabulary in oral and written language.
      • Student completes a definition for a vocabulary word.
      • Student demonstrates understanding of vocabulary by using the word in context correctly and applying it in a new context.

Suggested Instructional Supports

  • View
    Scaffolding, Active Engagement, Modeling, Explicit Instruction
    W: Help students extend knowledge of vocabulary about communities through analyzing a word, defining it, determining synonyms and antonyms, and using context clues. 
    H: Review vocabulary words about communities and discuss what the words mean. 
    E: Provide opportunities for students to determine the meanings of words and apply their understanding of words through developing sentences and determining synonyms and/or antonyms where applicable. Model for students how to use a graphic organizer to understand the meaning of content-specific vocabulary. 
    R: Determine which students need additional practice or reteaching. Work with these students individually or in small groups to reinforce understanding of the new vocabulary. 
    E: Observe students as they participate in activities and focus on students’ ability to apply and extend vocabulary in oral and written language. 
    T: Provide opportunities for students to work together in a large group and with a partner to reinforce learning. 
    O: Students work individually, in small groups, or with a partner to complete the learning activities in this lesson. 

Instructional Procedures

  • View

    Focus Question: How can we extend our understanding of words about communities?

    Read a book about communities and have students identify unfamiliar vocabulary or have them recall the vocabulary from Lesson 1 (e.g., community, neighborhood, bakery, laundromat, supermarket, garbage collector, firefighter, city, and suburb). Discuss the meanings of the words.

    Write the terms synonym and antonym on the board and review their meanings. (Synonyms are words that mean the same or almost the same. Antonyms are words that mean the opposite.) Choose specific words, such as city, supermarket, garbage. Ask students to give synonyms and antonyms for the words. (e.g., city: town/country or farm; supermarket: grocery store/convenience store; garbage: trash/valuables) Say, “Finding synonyms and antonyms is a strategy that helps us learn more about words. Some words do not have synonyms or antonyms. In this lesson, we are going to learn other strategies to help us learn more about words.”

    Part 1

    Before the lesson, choose six content words from the books you have read in class and prepare the Interactive Vocabulary templates (L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 1.docx and L-2-1-2_Interactive Vocabulary Option 2.docx) to use as models.

    Choose either option 1 or 2 and prepare or modify the template to meet the needs of your students. To prepare the template: Write the vocabulary word. If students are familiar with parts of speech, fill in the appropriate part of speech. You may wish to review the following terms with students:

    • Noun: the name of a person, place, or thing.
    • Verb: an action word.
    • Adjective: a word that describes a person, place, or thing.

    Provide an example of a synonym and an example of an antonym for the word. Note that some words may not have an antonym. If that is the case, simply draw a line or x in the space. Provide a portion of the definition but leave a word or two for students to complete. For the first “in class” sentence, students will write the vocabulary word. For the second sentence, write the vocabulary word in the sentence and have students fill in the additional information. For the “exit cards,” have students either extend the sentence or draw a picture of the word.

    Display a copy of the template on the interactive whiteboard. The model below is based on Option 1 and uses the word volunteer. Begin by saying the vocabulary word and having students repeat the word. Say, “Volunteer—say the word with me: volunteer.”

    Spell the word together. Instruct students to repeat the word. Use the word in a sentence: “The volunteer put the books away.”

    If you are including parts of speech, tell students this word is a noun or guide students to discover that it is used as a noun in the sentence.

    Tell students that helper is a synonym for volunteer. Helper means the same thing as volunteer. Tell students that employee is an antonym for volunteer. An employee is someone who gets paid to do work.

    Together read aloud the definition in the top right box and fill in the missing word on the template. Ask, “What word would complete the sentence? A _______ is someone who does not get paid to do work.” (volunteer)

    Read the first “in class” sentence to students. “After the hurricane hit, the _____ began to build houses for those in need.” Have a student tell what word to fill in. (volunteers) Read aloud the completed sentence.

    Read the second sentence. “The volunteers helped _____.Let partners discuss how they would complete the sentence. (Example: The volunteers helped the children at school learn to read.) Complete the sentence with a student’s suggestion.

    Have students read and complete the “exit card” independently. Encourage several students to share their sentences.

    Part 2

    Instruct students to complete a copy of the graphic organizer with a partner. You may have them use the words provided on Interactive Vocabulary Option 1 or other words that you have filled in. More advanced students may use Interactive Vocabulary Option 2 with words of their choice.

    As students are working, walk around the room and provide support as needed. Have students share their work with the class. Collect students’ work and check for understanding.

    Extension:

    • Students who are ready to move beyond the standard might create a “connect two” by choosing two words and writing them in a single sentence. Encourage students to write a logical sentence that uses both words correctly.
    • Have students draw a cartoon that illustrates the meaning of a word.
    • For students who need additional opportunities for learning, simplify the graphic organizer by filling in the definition and synonym/antonym. Work with students to create sentences.

Related Instructional Videos

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Final 3/7/14
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