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Impromptu Speaking, Grades 9-12 IU #11 SAS Test

Lesson Plan

Impromptu Speaking, Grades 9-12 IU #11 SAS Test

Grade Levels

10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, 9th Grade

Course, Subject

English Language Arts
Related Academic Standards
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  • Big Ideas
    Comprehension requires and enhances critical thinking and is constructed through the intentional interaction between reader and text
    Effective speaking and listening are essential for productive communication.
    Information to gain or expand knowledge can be acquired through a variety of sources.
    Listening provides the opportunity to learn, reflect, and respond
    Purpose, topic and audience guide types of writing
    Writing is a means of documenting thinking
    Writing is a recursive process that conveys ideas, thoughts and feelings
    Active listeners make meaning from what they hear by questioning, reflecting, responding and evaluating.
    Audience and purpose influence the writer’s choice of organizational pattern, language, and literacy techniques.
    Effective speakers prepare and communicate messages to address the audience and purpose
  • Concepts
    Active listening facilitates learning and communication.
    Essential content, literary elements and devices inform meaning
    Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions work together to impact writing quality
    Informational sources have unique purposes.
    Informational writing describes, explains and/or summarizes ideas or content in a variety of genre.
    Organization of information facilitates meaning.
    Persuasive writing attempts to influence the audience by presenting an issue and stating and supporting a position.
    Purpose, context and audience influence the content and delivery in speaking situations
    The writing supports a thesis or research question based on research, observation, and/or experience.
    Validity of information must be established.
    Content for Writing
    Conventions of Standard English
    Critical Listening
    Organization for Writing
    Purpose, Audience and Task
    Writing Style
  • Competencies
    Construct parallel structures between sentences and paragraphs.
    Construct parallel structures between sentences, paragraphs and related documents.
    Deliver effective oral presentations by o establishing a clear and concise focus or thesis o selecting and using appropriate structures, content and language to present ideas that support the thesis o utilizing appropriate technology or media to reinforce the message o employing effective delivery techniques: volume, pace eye contact, emphasis, gestures, enunciation o monitoring the response of the audience and adjusting delivery accordingly
    Develop search procedures to locate and gather information from traditional sources (libraries) as well as electronic databases, data sets and other electronic reference materials.
    Employ effective organizational strategies and structures, such as logical order and transitions, which develop a controlling idea (organization).
    Evaluate and respond to the speaker’s message by analyzing and synthesizing information, ideas, and opinions
    Evaluate the effects of inclusion and exclusion of information in persuasive text
    Follow the conventional style for the type of document and use page formats, fonts and spacing that contribute to the readability and impact of the document.
    Identify a single thesis, research question or topic. Attribute sources of information when appropriate. Use information in maps, charts, graphs, time lines, tables and diagrams to inform writing.
    Incorporate appropriate transitions within and between paragraphs.
    Informational Writing: Develop substantial, relevant and illustrative content that demonstrates a clear understanding of the purpose (content).
    Informational Writing: Employ effective organizational strategies and structures, such as logical order and transitions, which develop a controlling idea (organization).
    Informational Writing: Use proper conventions to compose in the standard form of the English language (conventions).
    Integrate appropriate transitions within and between paragraphs.
    Interact effectively in discussions by o maintaining the focus of the discussion by contributing relevant content o selecting and using appropriate language o asking relevant and clarifying questions o monitoring the response of participants and adjusting contributions accordingly o employing effective delivery techniques: volume, pace eye contact, emphasis, gestures, enunciation
    Listen Actively and monitor one’s own understanding by asking probing questions, paraphrasing, summarizing and/or reflecting on the speaker’s message
    Listen with civility to the ideas of others
    Narrative Writing: Employ effective organizational strategies and structures, such as logical order and transitions, which develop a controlling idea (organization).
    Narrative Writing: Use proper conventions to compose in the standard form of the English language (conventions).
    Persuasive Writing: Develop substantial, relevant and illustrative content that demonstrates a clear understanding of the purpose (content).
    Persuasive Writing: Employ a thoroughly elaborated argument that includes a clear position consistently supported with precise and relevant evidence where rhetorical persuasive strategies are evident (content).
    Persuasive Writing: Employ effective organizational strategies and structures, such as logical order and transitions, which develop a controlling idea (organization).
    Persuasive Writing: Use proper conventions to compose in the standard form of the English language (conventions).
    Persuasive Writing: Write with a sharp, distinct controlling point made about a single topic with evident awareness of task and audience (focus).
    Persuasive Writing: Write with precise control of language, stylistic techniques, and sentence structures that create a consistent and effective tone (style).
    Use organizational patterns that support key ideas and are appropriate to format and purpose. (organization)
    Use proper conventions to compose in the standard form of the English language (conventions).
    Use socially and academically appropriate writing conventions in a variety of formal and informal communication.
    Write to influence the audience by:• stating and supporting a position with detailed evidence, examples, and reasons. • using persuasive techniques (e.g.: emotional appeal, statistics, description, anecdote, example, expert opinion) to strengthen the argument. • employing a distinct structure to organize the argument and the opposing viewpoints. • acknowledging and refuting opposing arguments. • evaluating sources for validity, perspective, bias, and relationship to topic.• documenting sources of information responsibly and ethically. • using sources to achieve a balanced and authoritative argument. • supporting judgments with relevant evidence and detail.
    Write to influence the audience by:• stating and supporting a position with detailed evidence, examples, and reasons. • using persuasive techniques (e.g.: emotional appeal, statistics, description, anecdote, example, expert opinion, analogies and illustrations) to strengthen the argument. • employing a distinct structure to organize the argument and the opposing viewpoints. • acknowledging and refuting opposing arguments. • evaluating primary and secondary sources for validity, perspective, bias, and relationship to topic. • documenting sources of information responsibly and ethically. • using sources to achieve a balanced and authoritative argument. • supporting judgments with relevant evidence and detail. • presenting the position in either a deductive or an inductive framework.
    Write to inform by: • presenting information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience. • applying organizational structures that communicate information and ideas accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies fact from opinion. • developing informational genres that relate to a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g.: instructions, memos, e-mails, correspondence, project plans, proposals, and resumes).
    Write to inform by: • presenting information purposefully and succinctly to meet the needs of the intended audience. • applying organizational structures that communicate information and ideas accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies fact from opinion. • communicating quantitative and qualitative technical information and concepts from primary and secondary sources accurately and coherently. • using language that qualifies evidence from inference. • developing informational genres that relate to a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g.: instructions, memos, e-mails, correspondence, project plans, proposals, and resumes).
    Focus, content, organization, style, and conventions work together to impact writing quality
    Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking based on grade 11- 12 level and content.
    Evaluate how the speaker’s perspective, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric affect the credibility of an argument through the author’s stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone.
    Informational: Develop and analyze the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Argumentative: Distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims; develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. Narrative: Use narrative techniques such as dialogue, description, reflection, multiple plot lines, and pacing, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters; use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, settings, and/or characters.
    Informational: Organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create whole; use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text; provide a concluding statement or section that supports the information presented; include formatting when useful to aiding comprehension. Argumentative: Create organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence; Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims; provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. Narrative: Create a smooth progression of experiences or events using a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome; provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
    Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective; organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
    Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.

Rationale

Impromptu speaking challenges a speaker to develop an organized speech in a limited time period using arguments and supporting details from his or her own observations, experiences, and readings. The accomplished impromptu speaker will touch the listener by his or her insight of the topic and by using a polished speaking style. This impromptu speaking lesson allows a student to improve impromptu speaking skills in an enjoyable, non-threatening speaking environment. Students become better speakers through guidance and practice. A student will be guided through the steps of giving an impromptu speech and will then practice these steps by giving repeated impromptu speeches. To accommodate all student learners, the impromptu speech procedure may be altered to ensure a successful speaking experience for all speakers. To spark interest and encourage the “best” speech giving, all students will participate in five impromptu speech contests. Since it is a contest, all students will also serve as a judge. The student judge will be trained to effectively evaluate in a spirit of fellowship fellow impromptu speakers. Last, all students will reflect on their impromptu speaking skills and judging experience as they write a self-reflection. Through using this enjoyable contest learning strategy, students should become more productive oral communicators by using their impromptu speaking skills in a student-centered learning community.

Vocabulary

Impromptu Contest Vocabulary 

 

Impromptu  

The student participates as a speaker who has had only five minutes to draw a topic, prepare, and then present a well-developed three to five minute informative or persuasive speech to a judge.

Impromptu Judge

The student will also participate as a judge in the speech contest. The judge will listen to four to five speakers in his or her class and evaluate their speaking skills.  The judge will rank the four to five students with first place being the best speaker, second place being the next best speaker, and so on. 

Proctor

The teacher or a selected student who conducts the draw for topics and calls when speakers are to go to their judges to give their impromptu speeches.

Speaking Position

The impromptu speaker is assigned when he will speak based upon his seat number in each row.  The person sitting in the first seat is speaker 1, the second seat speaker 2, etc.

Draw

The impromptu speaker walks to the proctor’s table and pulls one slip from the assigned envelope. The slip contains three impromptu topics.  The student quickly chooses one topic, tells the topic number to the proctor, and returns to his or her seat to prepare an impromptu speech.

Delivery Skill Vocabulary

 

Poise

A composed speaker who exhibits an authoritative command of the speech content, who exhibits a confident command of delivery skills, maintains excellent posture, and uses strong facial and body language when communicating ideas.

Sustained Eye Contact

The speaker pauses and looks eye to eye at each listener for several seconds, moves to the next speaker and looks eye to eye for several seconds, and continues using this technique throughout the speech.

Vocal Variety

The speaker projects the voice to command attention, varies the speaking rate and pitch to engage the listener, and sounds enthusiastic.

 

Impromptu Speech Writing Vocabulary

 

Introduction Attention Step 

The speaker grabs the attention of the listener by using various opening techniques such as rhetorical questions, a story, a quotation, or a creative method. The attention step should be linked to the conclusion’s round-off.

Impromptu Thesis Statement

The thesis statement must immediately answer the impromptu question (yes, no) or give a position (agree, disagree).  Next, the thesis statement must include a blueprint of the three points  to be addressed in the speech. The thesis statement should follow the introduction attention step and should also be re-capped in the conclusion. The thesis statement is the logical aspect of the speech introduction.

Summary Transition

To maintain speech coherence, the speaker briefly reviews the previous point         (point 1) and then introduces the next point (point 2).

Example:Besides Scout being a curious little girl (recap of point 1) in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, she is also an intelligent character (introduction of point 2).

Supporting Details

Speakers should develop the speech by using a variety of supporting details such as facts, analogies, stories, statistics, examples, testimonies or quotations, and definitions. Speakers should develop the speech content in more depth than by just listing examples or facts to support a main point.

Concluding Round-off

After re-capping the thesis statement, the speaker should conclude the speech by linking the introduction attention step to the end of the speech by referring to the rhetorical questions, the story, the quotation, or the creative method. This method, the round-off, is the emotional ending that should engage the listener.

Self-reflection

In a paragraph the student should analyze the impromptu speech experience by thinking about the topic choice, the preparation, the content, and the delivery. The speaker should reflect upon the strengths, weaknesses, and give suggestions for improvement.

 

Objectives

The student will define impromptu vocabulary words.

The student will use the proper format to write an impromptu speech.

The student will practice writing an impromptu speech with a partner.

The student will practice delivery of the impromptu speech.

The student will perfect his or her speaking skills by participating in an impromptu speaking contest.

The student will draw for an impromptu topic.

The student will judge an impromptu speaking contest.

The student will reflect upon his or her impromptu speaking and judging experience.

 

Lesson Essential Question(s)

How do active listeners know what to believe in what they hear?
How do active listeners make meaning?
How do speakers employ language and utilize resources to effectively communicate a message?
How do task, purpose, and audience influence how speakers craft and deliver a message?
What do good listeners do?
What makes clear and effective writing?
What will work best for the audience?
Who is my audience?

What roles do writing and speaking play in our daily lives?

How do we develop into effective every day writers and speakers?

How does productive oral communication rely on speaking and listening every day?

How do we hone our impromptu speaking skills in everyday life?

How is self-reflection valuable in perfecting impromptu speaking?

How does judging other students carry over to situations where evaluation is a necessity to decision-making?

 

Duration

Approximately eight days are required for the duration of this impromptu speaking activity.

Use two class periods to explain how to write an impromptu speaking.

Use one class period to explain the drawing and judging procedure.

Approximately, five days are required to complete the contest portion of the activity.

The duration may vary depending upon the writing and speaking skills of the class members.

Materials

Impromptu Speaking Handouts and PowerPoint Slide Shows

Handout A:  Impromptu Vocabulary Definitions, Reading

Handout A Impromptu Vocabulary Definitions Reading.docx

Handout B:  Impromptu Vocabulary Worksheet, Review

Handout B Impromptu Vocabulary Review July 14, 2013.docx

Handout PPT C: How to Write an Impromptu Speech

Handout PPT C How to Write an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Handout D: Impromptu Speaker Notes

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Handout PPT E:  How to Deliver an Impromptu Speech

Handout PPT E How to Deliver an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Handout F:  Delivery Crossword Puzzle Review

Handout F Delivery Crossword Puzzle Review.docx

Handout PPT G:  Draw for Topic and Called to Speak Directions

Handout PPT G Draw for the Topic and Called to Speak Directions.pptm

Handout H:  112 Impromptu Topics

Handout H 112 Impromptu Topic Questions.docx

Handout I: Impromptu Draw Chart

Handout I Impromptu Draw Chart.docx

Handout J:  Impromptu Judge’s Rubric

Handout J Impromptu Judge's Rubric.docx

Handout K:  Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines         

Handout K Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines.docx
                                                                     

Handout L:  Impromptu Judge’s Ranking Sheet

Handout L Impromptu Judge's Ranking Sheet.docx

Handout M:  Self-Reflection, Impromptu Speaker and Judge    

Handout M Self-Reflection Impromptu Speaker and Judge.docx                                                                       

Handout PPT N:  Judging

Handout PPT N Judging.pptm

 

Additional Items

Clock or watch

Stopwatches or laptop computers for use of the online stopwatch website

Award certificates, prizes  (optional)

 

 

Suggested Instructional Strategies

W: Where/Why/What:  Impromptu speaking challenges a speaker to develop an organized speech in a limited time period using arguments and supporting details from his or her own observations, experiences, and readings. Students will become better speakers through guidance and practice. A student will be guided through the steps of giving an impromptu speech and will then practice these steps by giving repeated impromptu speeches in a non-threatening speaking environment.  Writing, practicing, and speaking will be evaluated upon the completion of daily classroom activities, worksheets, and practice sessions.
H:

 

Hook:  To spark interest and encourage the “best” speech giving,  all students will participate in five impromptu speech contests.   Since it is a contest, all students will also serve as a judge.  The non-threatening contest atmosphere should create a spirit of fellowship in the classroom community while encouraging mastery of impromptu speaking skills.

E:  

Explore/Experience/Equip:  Through guided practice students will write and practice impromptu speaking using a step by step process.   Following the guided practice, the culminating activity for students will be participating in an impromptu speech contest where all students will be contestants giving four speeches and serving once  as a judge.  Through using this enjoyable contest learning strategy, students should become more productive oral communicators by using  their impromptu speaking skills in a student-centered learning community.

R:  

Rethink/Rehearse/Revise/Refine:  Because students will be participating in four impromptu speaking contests, students can reflect upon their preparation, rehearsal, and delivery skills after each speech.  Through this reflection students can rethink and revise their preparation strategy and focus upon improving specific delivery skills in the next contest.  After the impromptu speaking contest, all students will reflect on their impromptu speaking skills and judging experience as they write an overall self-reflection.

E:  

Evaluate:  Students will express their understanding  of impromptu speaking  through completion of daily guided writing and speaking activities, through participation and evaluation of their speaking skills in the impromptu speaking contest, and through serving as student judges  who must analyze speakers and determine a speech  score and a rank for each student speech judged.  Last, students will reflect upon their speaking and judging experience as they write a self-reflection.

T:

 

Tailored:   To accommodate all student learners, the impromptu speech procedure may be altered to ensure a successful speaking experience for all speakers.  

 

These   learning strategies and styles are embedded in the instructional procedures to meet the needs of all learners:

 

Modeling and Written Steps, how to write an impromptu speech.

Think Aloud with Students, writing together a practice impromptu speech.

Teacher or a Student Demonstration, giving an impromptu speech.

Mental Rehearsal, think through the preparation process and also mentally practice    the impromptu speech.

Conducting a Contest, to practice impromptu speaking skills.

Cooperative Learning, groups of four to five students work together in the contest situation.

Serve as a Student Judge, evaluate four to five fellow impromptu speakers to teach and practice proper evaluation of a speech.

Provide Recognition of first or second place speakers each day at the end of the contest.

Graphic Organizer,  used to prepare impromptu speeches.

Problem-solving, many of the impromptu topics require students to solve a problem.

Logical Thinking, students must answer their impromptu topic in a logical manner.

Bodily-Kinesthetic Activity, students can gesture or use bodily movements during the speech.  Students also are moving about the room to drawing locations, speaking locations, and judging locations.

Interpersonal Skills, the student judge must respond appropriately to the speaker’s feelings when writing evaluative comments, and the student speaker must respond appropriately to the judge’s feelings when ranking results are released.

Writing to Learn, self- reflection  giving the impromptu speech and serving as a judge.

Creating a Friendly Learning Environment,  speaking in a non-threatening, enjoyable atmosphere that encourages learning  to speak in a spirit of fellowship.

Guided Practice Strategy,  writing the parts of the speech, and guided practice of  the impromptu speech will aid the struggling learner and the ELL student.

Fluency Practice Strategy, Practicing impromptu speaking by giving four to five speeches will develop speaking fluency especially for the ELL student.

Vocabulary and Language Development Strategy, develop vocabulary through the study of words associated with impromptu speaking.

Guided Interaction Strategy, Work together with other students preparing, practicing,  and delivering impromptu speeches.

Explicit Instruction Strategy, direct instruction through short lectures on how to write, practice, speak, and judge.

Meaning-based Context and Universal Themes Strategy, Impromptu topic selection includes many topics that high school students are interested in such as extracurricular activities, sporting activities, clubs, course work, and jobs.

 

 

These Instructional Strategies Are Options for Struggling Students and ELL Students.

 

The teacher may choose specific topics that will be easier for the student to answer.

The teacher may pair two or three students together and divide the speech parts between the speakers.

The teacher may give the students additional preparation time, such as 10 minutes.

The teacher may require the students to speak for only 1-2 minutes or 3-4 minutes.

The teacher may have two student judges judge a group of students. The students may compare judging notes after the speech and determine the ranks together.

The teacher or another student could model the impromptu process using an electronic whiteboard so that students could observe another student drawing a topic, preparing the speech on the whiteboard, practicing, and speaking.

The teacher could have a student use a computer to type  his or her notes rather than hand writing the notes.  The student could also speak using the computer monitor.

 

O:

 

Organized:  The impromptu speaking lesson is organized in a step by step process that teaches impromptu writing and speaking skills in a step by step method to ensure all aspects of the speech process are taught, practiced, monitored by the teacher,  practiced again, and gradually mastered by individual students in the impromptu speech contest.  

The impromptu speaking lesson will include teacher guided writing and delivery practice for the whole group, partner work practice, small group work during the speech contest, and individual independent work as the student prepares to speak, speaks to the judge, and serves as a judge.  

               

 

Instructional Procedures

Step 1-Introduce  the Impromptu Speaking  Lesson:

 

Bodily-Kinesthetic Strategy,   Engage students by asking students to stand up and remain standing  if they compete for the high school in football, then volleyball, then golf, then basketball, then swimming,  then baseball or softball, then field and track, then Odyssey of the Mind, then forensic speech and debate competitions, then mock trial, then National History Day, then other gifted academic competitions, then videogame competitions with friends, finally board game competitions.  Hopefully, all students are standing. Students may be seated.

 Inquiry-based Question Strategy, Ask students what everyone had in common with these examples.  Answers:  Competition, activities students are interested

Tell students we will have an impromptu speaking competition in our class using topics that reflect their daily life,  but first we must learn the impromptu vocabulary words, then we must learn how to write an impromptu speech, how to draw for an impromptu speech, and how to judge an impromptu speech, and then we will reflect upon our speaking and judging experiences.

 Video Option: Show the video of IHSA 2007-2008 State Champion - Impromptu Speaking - YouTube. Discuss  why this speech is of championship caliber.

 

Step 2-Define the Impromptu Vocabulary Words.

  

Read the handout, Handout A:  Impromptu Vocabulary Definitions, Reading.  

Handout A Impromptu Vocabulary Definitions Reading.docx

 Review the vocabulary words using Handout B: Impromptu Vocabulary Worksheet, Review.

  

Step 3-How to Write an  Impromptu Speech

 

Teacher:  Use Handout PPT C: How to Write an Impromptu Speech

 

Handout PPT C How to Write an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Create student interest with Have You Explained Questions, slides 1-4.

Model How to Write a complete Impromptu Speech using topic, Is the Prom too expensive? (slide 6)

Explain Handout J:  Impromptu Judge’s Rubric so that students know the criteria for evaluation.

Handout J Impromptu Judge's Rubric.docx

 

How to Write the Introduction

 

Handout PPT C How to Write an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Model the Two Parts of an Introduction, slide 7.

Model Methods How  to Write an Attention Step using a  Story, Rhetorical Questions, Quotation ,or a Creative Method, slides 8,9,10,11,12.

Model How to Write a Thesis Statement, slide 13.

Review the complete written introduction, slide 14.

Distribute Handout D: Impromptu Speaker Notes.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Use Think, Pair, Share: Have two students write an introduction with the position, No, the prom is not too expensive.

Write the practice introduction on the graphic organizer, Handout D: Impromptu Speaker Notes.

Move around the room Thinking Aloud with Students helping students and checking for completion of the introduction.

Ask selected students to deliver their introductions to the class.

Discuss the introduction techniques and effect with the class.

Review the introduction parts and methods using the student models.

Video Option: Listen to the opening attention step and discuss the methods. What were the main points of the thesis statement? IHSA 2007-2008 State Champion - Impromptu Speaking - YouTube

Technology Option: Use an electronic whiteboard to have the class together write an introduction.

Reading Option: Students may read the link Impromptu Speaking Tips | trainingmag.com

 

How to Write the Speech Body

 

Handout PPT C How to Write an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Review thesis statement and main points that the prom is too expensive for girls, guys, and parents, slides 16,17.

Define supporting details, slide 18.

Model main point #1,2,3 with supporting details, slides 19,20,21,22.

Define summary transition and show model, slides 20,21.

Review kinds of supporting details.

Use Think, Pair, Share: Have the same two students use the graphic organizer Handout D to write three main points with supporting details why the prom is not too expensive.

Move around the room Thinking Aloud with Students to assist them and check for assignment completion.

Have each student pair place one copy of the graphic organizer in a display area.

Conduct a gallery walk around the room so that students may view other class partner’s main points and details.

After the gallery walk, discuss ideas and supporting details of class work with students.

Technology Option: Use an electronic whiteboard to have the class together write the speech body developing ideas and support for the prom is not too expensive.

Video Option: Listen to the speech body and discuss the development of ideas.

IHSA 2007-2008 State Champion - Impromptu Speaking - YouTube

 

How to Write the Conclusion

 

Handout PPT C How to Write an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Model re-stating the thesis statement, slide 25. 

Define the second part of the conclusion, the round-off, slide 26.                                                                     

Model the link between the round-off and the introduction attention step, slide 27.

Review the conclusion parts, slide 28.

Use Think, Pair, Share with the same partners to write a conclusion using Handout D: Impromptu Speaking Notes.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Move around the classroom using Thinking Aloud with Students to assist them and check for conclusion completion.

Ask selected partners to read aloud their thesis statement.

Ask a Think, Pair, Share team to read aloud its introduction thesis statement.

Next, ask the team to read its introduction attention step, and then read aloud its round-off.

Ask other class members how the attention step and the round-off linked together.

Video Option: Listen to the conclusion and note how it links to the opening attention step.

 IHSA 2007-2008 State Champion - Impromptu Speaking - YouTube

 Reading Option:  Interview with Iain Lampert about Impromptu Speaking and Judging

 

 

Step 4-How to Deliver the Impromptu Speech      

 

Teacher:    Use Handout PPT E How to Deliver an Impromptu Speech.

Handout PPT E How to Deliver an Impromptu Speech.pptm

Explain why wait before speaking, slide 2.

Explain strong delivery skills:

Good posture, slide 3

                Kinesthetic Activity: Have students stand together with good posture.

                Walk around the classroom checking for good posture.

                Maintain poise, slide 4

                Use sustained eye contact, slide 5

                How to use speaker notes and sustained eye contact, slide 6

Practice with all class members together aloud giving their speech from the speaker notes while maintaining sustained eye contact.

Walk around the room checking student sustained eye contact.

                Project voice, slide 7

Practice  aloud together with the entire class participating saying the introduction attention step while projecting the voice.

                Slow rate, slide 8

Practice  aloud together with the entire class the thesis statement pausing after each main point.

Practice with the entire class practicing aloud together main points 2 and 3 pausing after the summary transitions.

Vary pitch, slide 9

Practice with the entire class practicing aloud together the supporting details for main point 2.

Practice with the entire class practicing aloud together the supporting details for main point 3.

                Be enthusiastic, slide 10

Practice aloud with the entire class together main point 1 and details using exaggerated enthusiasm.

                Use vocal variety, slide 11

                Look and act alive, slide 12

Practice aloud with the entire class saying the conclusion together using vocal variety.

Practice the entire speech with students mouthing the words, not even whispering, but moving the lips, since this is how the students must practice the speech before an impromptu presentation, slides 13,14.

Optional Activity: Review with Handout F: Delivery Crossword Puzzle.

Handout F Delivery Crossword Puzzle Review.docx

Reading Option: Students may read the link Impromptu Speaking Tips | trainingmag.com

Video Option: Have the class discuss the strong delivery skills of the speaker.

Have each Think, Pair, Share partner take turns delivering the impromptu speech from the speaker notes to his or her partner.

 

Step 5-The How and  What, Conducting and Participating in an  Impromptu Speech Contest

 

How to Organize the Students for the Impromptu Contest

Show Handout PPT  G: Draw for Topic and Called to Speak Directions to explain how to organize the class for the contest, slides 6,7,8.

Handout PPT G Draw for the Topic and Called to Speak Directions.pptm

In a class of 25 students, 20 students will speak and 5 students will judge.

This first group of speeches is called Round I (one).                                                                                             

Assign each judge to Row 1, Row 2, Row 3, Row 4,  Row 5.

Randomly assign the other 20 students where to sit in Row 1, Row 2, Row 3, Row 4, or Row 5.

Place 4 students in a row.

The students sitting in the first seat of each row are called the first speakers.

The students sitting in the second seat of each row are called the second speaker, etc.

 

How to Prepare the Impromptu Topics

 

 

Use Handout H: 112  Impromptu Topics

Handout H 112 Impromptu Topic Questions.docx

Option:  Write informative or persuasive impromptu topics a student can speak about based on course content.

Write topics from easy to challenging on each slip or the topics can become more challenging for each successive round.

Extension Activity:  Students can write impromptu topics.

Cut the impromptu topic slips apart (3 topics /slip) and make 5 envelopes labeled Row 1, Row 2, etc.

Handout H:  112 Impromptu Topics mark what topic slips to use for each Round II, III, IV, V and again label the envelopes for rows.

 

How the Student Proctor Will Conduct the Impromptu Draw

 

 

Show Handout PPT  G: : Draw for Topic and Called to Speak Directions.

Explain the draw vocabulary definitions and procedure, slides 6-14.

Handout PPT G Draw for the Topic and Called to Speak Directions.pptm

Choose one reliable student to serve as the student proctor to call students for the round.

Call first speakers to draw a topic at the front table.

Say “First speakers come to draw.”

Remind the speakers to draw only from the envelope assigned to their row.

Students are not to look into the envelope when drawing the topic slip.

Record the name, topic number, time drawn, and time to speak on Handout I:  Impromptu Draw Chart. Use a watch or clock to record the time.

Handout I Impromptu Draw Chart.docx

The first speaker will return to his or her seat and prepare a speech using Handout D: Impromptu Speaking Notes.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Conduct a walk-through with all class members participating in drawing topic slips.

For the walk-through, as the student proctor calls speakers, the speaker should pretend to draw topics.

 

How the  Student Proctor Should Call the Speakers  Who Are to Speak to the Judge

 

 

Show Handout PPT G: Draw for Topic and Called to Speak Directions to explain how the speakers are called, slides 12,13,14.

Handout PPT G Draw for the Topic and Called to Speak Directions.pptm

Follow Handout I: Impromptu Draw Chart for times to speak.

Handout I Impromptu Draw Chart.docx

Call the first speakers to move to their assigned judge to give their impromptu speech after five minutes of prep time as listed on the draw chart.

Say, “First speakers go to your judge assigned.”

Repeat several times.

Remind students to take their Speaker Notes and their Impromptu Topic slips.

Mark the time you called the speakers to speak on Handout I: Impromptu Draw Chart, last column.

Conduct a Walk-through with all class members participating by reporting to their assigned judge location.  The judges should also be in place.

 

What the Speaker Should Do When Called to Speak

 

 

Show Handout PPT G: Draw for Topic and Called to Speak Directions to explain how the speakers are called, slide, 14.

Handout PPT G Draw for the Topic and Called to Speak Directions.pptm

Take Handout D:  Impromptu Speaker Notes to refer to when speaking.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Give the judge the topic slip drawn and the question number.

Show Handout  PPT  N:  Judging   to define and explain speaker etiquette before a judge, slide 4,6.

Handout PPT N Judging.pptm

Wait quietly (speaker) until the judge is ready to listen.

Check you and the judge can see the stopwatch.

Wait until the judge signals he or she is ready to judge  before beginning to speak.

Technology Option:  Student judges and speakers can use an online stopwatch to time the speech  if they have access to a laptop computer.  Online Stopwatch

 

What the Student Judge Should Do When Listening to the Speaker

 

 

Read Handout K: Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines.

Handout K Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines.docx

Complete Handout J: Impromptu Judge’s Rubric heading information.

Handout J Impromptu Judge's Rubric.docx

Show Handout PPT N: Judging to explain judging etiquette, slide 5.

Handout PPT N Judging.pptm

Check you and speaker can see the stopwatch. Online Stopwatch

Start the stopwatch when the speaker begins to talk.

Listen to the speech while scoring each part of Handout J: Impromptu Judge’s Rubric.

Handout J Impromptu Judge's Rubric.docx

Place the 3,2,1,0 score in the first column of each rubric part.

Write brief tactful comments, strengths, and suggestions when possible.

Stop the stopwatch when the speaker is completed speaking.

Write down the speaker's time on Handout J: Impromptu Judge's Rubric.  Ex:  1:15

Tally the point totals.

 

What the Student Judge Should Do When All of the Speakers Are Done Speaking

 

 

Arrange the Impromptu Judge’s Rubrics from all speakers in a pile from the highest number of points to the lowest number of points.

Break all ties of speakers. 

Read Handout K:  Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines to help break ties.

Handout K Impromptu Judging Procedures and Guidelines.docx

Read the comments you have written to also help you break the ties.

Then, adjust the points to break the ties on all speakers' Handout J:  Impromptu Judge’s Rubric sheets.

Handout J Impromptu Judge's Rubric.docx

Rank all speakers. First place is best and must have the most number of points.

On Handout L:  Impromptu Ranking Sheet, complete the Rank Your Speakers table. 

Handout L Impromptu Judge's Ranking Sheet.docx

Handout PPT N Judging.pptm    See slide 7 for a sample rank table.

Organize all of your judging paperwork by placing your Ranking Sheet on the top followed by your Impromptu Judge’s Rubric of each student.

Paperclip your packet and place it in the teacher’s assignment bin for points.

Congratulations!  You have just successfully completed judging students!

Get ready!  The next round will start soon!

 

Recognize (teacher) All  First and Second Place Winners for Each Round

 

 

Show Handout PPT  N:  Judging, slide 8  And the Winners are…. Handout PPT N Judging.pptm

Congratulate first and second place speakers at the end of each round or at the end of the contest.

Recognize the student/s as the Most Improved Student, if  speakers have significantly improved from the first to the fifth round.

Award with certificates or selected prizes (optional).

  

Step 6- Student Self-Reflection

 

 

Show Handout PPT  N:  Judging, slide 9 reflection instructions.  Handout PPT N Judging.pptm

Reflect upon the speaking experience and the judging experience.

Distribute Handout M:  Self-Reflection, Impromptu Speaker and Judge

Handout M Self-Reflection Impromptu Speaker and Judge.docx

Discuss the reflections as a group or individually.

Show congratulations slide 10 for completing the impromptu speaking contest.

 

 

Formative Assessment

Student Assessments

 

Worksheet Assessments                                                                                                                                             

Points may be given for completion of Handout B:  Impromptu Vocabulary Worksheet, Review.

Handout B Impromptu Vocabulary Review.docx

Points may be given for Handout F:  Delivery Crossword Puzzle Review.

Points may be given for the Handout M: Self-Reflection Impromptu Speaker and Judge.


Handout F Delivery Crossword Puzzle Review.docx

 

Content Practice Assessment

Points may be given for the various Think ,Pair, Share  activities for writing the introduction, three main points and details, and conclusion.

Points may be given for completing Handout D:  Speaker Notes for each contest round.

Points may be given for various discussions such as the gallery walk discussion and the discussion of the impromptu speaker video.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx
 

Delivery Practice Assessment

Points may be given for the various Think ,Pair, Share practice activities when writing the introduction, three main points and details, and conclusion.

Points may be given for the various Think, Pair, Share delivery practices of the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Points may be given for the practice walk-throughs of the impromptu contest.

Points may be given to students who demonstrate selected skills.

 

Impromptu Contest Assessment

Points may be given for each impromptu speech delivered.

Points may be given for each completed Handout D: Speaker Notes.

Handout D Impromptu Speaker Notes.docx

Points may be given for the completed Handout L: Impromptu Judge’s Ranking sheet.

Handout L Impromptu Judge's Ranking Sheet.docx

Points may be given for the Handout M:  Self-Reflection,  Impromptu Speaker and Judge.

Handout M Self-Reflection Impromptu Speaker and Judge.docx

Points may be given for the self-reflection discussion.

Points may be  given for student cooperation of the numerous activities.

Points may be given for student proctor duties.

**Do not give assessment points based on first or second place rankings. Although we hope students will judge well,  the judges are novice judges and will sometimes make mistakes and rank speakers inappropriately.  Questionable ranking of students is part of the learning process and the self-reflection process.

 

 

 

 

 

Related Materials & Resources

Author

Sally M. Finley Nicholls Writing for IU #11 Belle Vernon Area High School Grades 9-12 Speech, Public Speaking Classes, Debate, English Classes

Date Published

July 29, 2013
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